| Kelsie Shields

Chamomile is a Natural Way to Help Dogs Calm Down!

Most people associate chamomile with a cup of tea often praised for its calming abilities. The herb is so much more than that. The white and yellow flower that has become common on store shelves and in fields alike has multiple benefits. These benefits are not limited to humans alone; chamomile is used to relax and calm anxious canines as safely and effectively as it does in its human counter parts. 

But first, a little history

Chamomile has been recorded as far back as ancient Egypt where it was used for everything from cosmetics to a cure for fevers. Although it is now relatively common, the plant is not native to North America and was brought here by early colonists from Europe. No matter its origin, chamomile is still used for many ailments from insomnia, to skin problems, headaches, and most often as a stress reliever.[i]

The all-natural, official chill pill

Pet owners always want what is best for their furry friend, and chamomile offers just that. The herb is known to act as a natural alleviator of insomnia and anxiety in humans and the good news is that it works just as well for your four legged friend. Even better, the benefits do not stop there which is why it’s built into many products including our industry-leading bedtime treat, Bedtime Bones®.

How exactly does it calm your pet? The little flower is good at keeping some of its secrets.

Why chamomile is so effective at naturally relieving multiple ailments is credited to several of the flower’s ingredients—Apigenin and Chamazulene[ii].

Apigenin, is a flavonoid, or pigment, found in many fruits and veggies. When tested, Apigenin was found to act as a muscle relaxer, an anti-convulsant, and most notably—a anxiolytic (anxiety inhibitor).[iii]
Chamazulene is a blue pigment most notably found in the German variety of chamomile and has been praised for its anti-allergy and anti-inflammatory properties.[iv]

Apigenin and Chamazulene both act similarly to aspirin, obstructing the production of chemical mediators responsible for inflammation, relaxing nerves and the digestive tract alike.[v]

This means that chamomile and its properties act as a minor natural sedative that can help calm anxious dogs, and it can also be used to help alleviate some of the issues that can come with the those problems. Chamomile can help with insomnia and digestion issues specifically, and it may be able to reduce a plethora of tummy troubles including bloating, pain, gas, and vomiting.[vi]

Other health benefits

Chamomile goes beyond relaxation though. The herb has been found to be antiseptic and antimicrobial as well as anxiolytic. It can also be used to help canines with skin irritation or wounds, assisting with conjunctivitis, and even inflamed gums or teething pains.[vii] (Yes, it’s not an accident that so many of our first time customers are teething puppies.)

Application

There are numerous ways to administer chamomile to your pet, but the two central means of application are topically or orally. The method used depends on what is being treated. Topically, salves and liquid infusions can be directly applied to the skin to help with skin-related and other external issues. For anxiety and hyperactivity, direct consumption may be best to start with and many products like chamomile infused treats (we may have known this when we developed Bedtime Bones) are available to help make your pup happy and healthy.

Consult your veterinarian

Check with your veterinarian when you are introducing anything new to your pet especially if she may be pregnant. 

Chamomile is a versatile herb that has been around for centuries.  It has helped many dog lovers calm their dogs naturally.  It offers a holistic approach to answering the problems of anxiety, hyperactivity, insomnia, and much more for humans and their dogs.

Sources: 

[i] Chamomile: Garden Flower, Weed, Tea. (n.d.). Retrieved May 26, 2019, from http://www.indepthinfo.com/chamomile

[ii] Marsden, S., Messonnier, S., & Yuill, C. (n.d.). Chamomile. Retrieved May 25, 2019, from https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/chamomile

[iii] Apigenin (2017). Retrieved May 26, 2019, from https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/pharmacology-toxicology-and-pharmaceutical-science/apigenin

[iv] Chamazulene. (n.d.). Retrieved May 26, 2019, from https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/chamazulene

[v] Chamomile Benefits for Dogs | Is Chamomile Good for Dogs? (n.d.). Retrieved May 28, 2019, from https://www.natural-dog-health-remedies.com/chamomile-benefits.html

[vi] Marsden, S., Messonnier, S., & Yuill, C. (n.d.). Chamomile. Retrieved May 25, 2019, from https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/chamomile

[vii] Chamomile Benefits for Dogs | Is Chamomile Good for Dogs? (n.d.). Retrieved May 28, 2019, from https://www.natural-dog-health-remedies.com/chamomile-benefits.html