I Feel A New Product Coming On....Does Your Dog Snore?

I Feel A New Product Coming On....Does Your Dog Snore?

So, last night I made a concerted effort to get to bed "on time."  "On time" in this household means I make it into bed some time before midnight.  Like so many people these days, 50 to 70 million people to be more exact, insomnia is just a part of life.  These days for me it's about the excitement of being a start up really.  The fact that that start up revolves around things I love makes it even cooler.  Sometimes it seems like there's just more fun reasons to be awake than asleep.

And then there was last night when my body was in dire need of rest.  I crawled into bed with my hubby and the VP of Quality Assurance (known to her closest friends as Koszi)  trying not to disturb anyone.  Well, that was a silly thing to worry about since there was a veritable caucophony of sound coming out of BOTH of them.  

Does your dog snore?  Well, apparently mine does now.  So when this morning came I did some research on what causes snoring in dogs just to make sure she's okay.   Turns out alot of the same things that cause snoring in people cause snoring in dogs, so please make sure your dog stops smoking.

Below is a list of common causes of snoring that you don't need to lose sleep over and some that you do. 

Congestion from allergies (Try to time their walks when pollution and pollen counts are lowest.)

Obesity (Yes, keep walking that dog!)

Medicines (Muscle relaxants and tranquilizers can cause minor swelling in the membranes!)

Having a Flat Face called brachycephalic faces (Sorry, Pugs and Peks.)

Sleeping Position (Dogs are less likely to snore sleeping curled up on their sides.)

 

If your dog is having food issues or is gasping or wheezing go see your vet.  In rare instances a new snorer may have developed cysts or tumors so ask about that too just in case.

We are considering launching a doggy snore strip.  Any takers?